The Basics

18Oct 2016

State-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries, whether used in smartphones or electric vehicles, all rely on the same fundamental cell structure: two opposing electrodes with an intermediate insulating separator layer, with lithium ions shuffling between the two electrodes.

The positive electrode during charging, usually called the cathode, consists of a multi-metal oxide alloy material. Lithium-cobalt-oxide, or LCO, is by far the most common for consumer electronic applications. NCM, short for lithium nickel-cobalt-manganese oxide, also known as NMC, is gradually replacing other materials in energy storage and electric vehicle applications. LCO and NCM have a great property of storing lithium ions within their material matrix. Think of a porous swiss cheese: the lithium ions insert themselves between the atomic layers.

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01Jul 2016

Sleep is an essential function of life. Tissue in living creatures regenerate during deep sleep. We, humans, get very cranky with sleep deprivation. And cranky we do get when our battery gets depleted because we did not give our mobile device sufficient “sleep time.”

I explained in a prior post the power needs in a smartphone, including the display, the radio functions…etc. If all these functions are constantly operating, the battery in a smartphone would last at most a couple of hours. So the key to having a smartphone battery last all day is having down time. So by now, you have hopefully noticed how the industry uses “sleep” terminology to describe these periods of time when the smartphone is nominally not active.

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17Jun 2016

I will jump ahead in this post to discuss the merits of different lithium-ion chemistries and their suitability to energy storage systems (ESS) applications. Naturally, this assumes that lithium-ion batteries in general are among the best suited technologies for ESS. Some might take issue with this point — and there are some merits for such a discussion that I shall leave to a future post.

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13Jun 2016

Since the installation of the first electrical power plant late in the 19th century, the business of supplying electricity to industry and residences has been “on demand.” When you flip a light switch in your home, you expect the light to go on. For this to happen, electricity has to flow to your light bulb through an elaborate transmission and distribution network (T&D) of copper wires. These wires ultimately connect your light bulb to a generator that sits dozens if not hundreds of miles away from you. When you turn on your light bulb, there is an additional demand in electricity, and that generator “works a little harder” to supply this required electricity. This is what I mean by “on demand.” On a hot summer afternoon, the demand is large, and these generators are working near or at full capacity. At night, the demand is lower, and there is available excess capacity.

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